Signs Of The Times RSS

Signs of the Times: The World for People who Think. Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on world events.
Signs of the Times
  1. Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH's All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US, officials focused limited testing capacity on symptomatic people who had recently traveled to or been in close contact with someone who had traveled to places with confirmed outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2. A year later, it's clear that some proportion of viral transmission — perhaps as high as 50 percent — comes from presymptomatic or asymptomatic individuals, making it difficult to trace transmission. In a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases June 15, researchers analyzed blood collected between January 2 and March 18, 2020, and found antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in samples from nine people in five US states, meaning that the virus was likely present in the US in late 2019. Ashley St. John, an infectious disease researcher at Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore who...
  2. Former President Donald Trump said Monday that he has not conceded the 2020 presidential race, that if the election is proven fraudulent it will be up to the public and "perhaps politicians" to decide how to respond, and that if Mike Pence had sent disputed election results back to state legislatures for review the country "might very well have a different president right now." Trump told Just the News' Water Cooler in an exclusive interview on Real America's Voice. "No, I never admitted defeat. We have a lot of things happening right now... all you have to do is read the newspapers and see what's coming out now." Last week during an interview with conservative commentator Sean Hannity, Trump had remarked about the 2020 contest that "shockingly, we were supposed to win easily at 64 million votes and we got 75 million votes and we didn't win, but let's see what happens on that." On the possibility of being reinstated as president if the 2020 contest is verified as fraudulent, Trump...
  3. Following the decision to freeze $100-million-worth of military aid due to be sent to Ukraine, the Russian Foreign Ministry has accused the US of acting immorally in its policy towards Kiev, and playing games for its own benefit. According to spokeswoman Maria Zakharova, Washington's decision to keep the money, despite once pledging it, shows how the US is manipulating both the citizens and leadership of Ukraine. When the support was initially proposed, it benefited Washington. A few months later, the situation has changed, and the US immediately changed its mind. Zakharova said: "This is a classic game with Ukraine on the part of the US. It is maneuvering and flirting. This [has been] a constant deception of the citizens of Ukraine for many years." The spokeswoman's statement comes after the White House denied temporarily freezing an aid package to Kiev worth up to $100 million. According to the publication Politico, Washington pledged the money earlier this spring, following a...
  4. Spain's socialist-led government will on Tuesday approve the deeply controversial pardons of the nine Catalan independence leaders who were jailed over their roles in the illegal, failed attempt to secede from the rest of the country in October 2017. The prime minister, Pedro Sánchez, has acknowledged that the decision will anger many Spaniards, but insists the act of clemency is the best way to bring the country back together and to help find a political solution to the enduring territorial crisis. Sánchez finally confirmed the long-anticipated move during a speech in Barcelona on Monday in which he stressed the need for coexistence, magnanimity and a fresh start. The pardons will be formally approved during Tuesday's cabinet meeting. The nine - among them six members of Catalonia's former government who had not fled Spain, plus the speaker of the regional parliament and two influential activists - were convicted of offences including sedition by the supreme court in 2019.
  5. Former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was acquitted due to lack of evidence Monday in one of the corruption cases for which he was being tried, it was announced. Together with Lula, six other officials who had also been charged with favouring auto companies in exchange for bribes were found not guilty. Judge Frederico Botelho de Barros Viana maintained the prosecution did not "convincingly demonstrate" how the former president and his chief of staff "had participated in the supposedly criminal context." The magistrate also specified that "there are elements that demonstrate the performance of Mauro Marcondes' company - Marcondes and Mautoni - in terms of the extension of tax benefits to CAOA and MMC companies, there is no adequate evidence and not even minimally capable of demonstrating the existence of an illicit adjustment between the accused to transfer amounts in favour of Lula and Carvalho," about former Cabinet Chief Gilberto Carvalho, who was also secretary of...
  6. Former Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who was installed following the expulsion of the Taliban* from Kabul, has harshly criticised the US and NATO for failing to eradicate terrorists in the country over the last two decades. He argued that western nations are leaving Afghanistan "in total disgrace and disaster". The view of American troops packing their things as they prepare to leave Afghanistan after nearly 20 years of war is apparently a sight for sore Taliban eyes. The group, which has been fighting against NATO forces for the last two decades, is treating this moment as their victory in the lengthy fight, The Daily Beast has reported citing a Taliban media official: "We strongly believe the US military was terribly defeated in Afghanistan. And they're running away from Afghanistan in a hurry", Taliban representative Khalid Zadran said. According to media reports, the Taliban is already making use of the situation. While the US hands over its military bases to Kabul's forces,...
  7. There's a liberal way to fight illiberalism. And it's beginning to work. The stories in the mainstream media this past week about the broadening campaign to ban critical race theory in public schools have been fascinating — and particularly in how they describe what CRT is. Here's the Atlantic's benign summary of CRT: "recent reexaminations of the role that slavery and segregation have played in American history and the attempts to redress those historical offenses." NBC News calls it the "academic study of racism's pervasive impact." NPR calls CRT: "teaching about the effects of racism." The New York Times calls it, with a straight face, "classroom discussion of race, racism" and goes on to describe it as a "framework used to look at how racism is woven into seemingly neutral laws and institutions." How on earth could merely teaching students about the history of racism and its pervasiveness in the United States provoke such a fuss? No wonder Charles Blow is mystified. But don't...
  8. Do you remember the names Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying? I wrote one of my earliest New York Times columns about the bravery they displayed as tenured professors — words that do not typically appear in the same sentence — at Evergreen State College. It was 2017 and the professors, both evolutionary biologists, opposed the school's "Day of Absence," in which white students were asked to leave campus for the day. You can imagine what followed. For questioning a day of racial segregation wearing the garments of social justice, the pair was smeared as racist. Following serious threats, they left town for a time with their children, lost many of their friends, and, ultimately, resigned their jobs. But they refused to shut up. They started a podcast called DarkHorse, where they suggested in April 2020 that Covid-19 could have come from the lab in Wuhan — a position that made them a laughingstock among so-called experts more than a year before Jon Stewart talked about it on The Late...
  9. US authorities have seized the web domains of Iran's international media outlets Press TV and Al-Alam, along with the Yemeni TV channel Al Masirah, run by the Houthi faction. Visitors to the three domains were greeted on Tuesday with a notice that they were seized under US laws that allow civil and criminal forfeiture of property involved in "trafficking in nuclear, chemical, biological, or radiological weapons technology or material, or the manufacture, importation, sale, or distribution of a controlled substance." The seizure notice by the US Department of Justice also invokes a law governing presidential authority in dealing with "unusual and extraordinary threat; declaration of national emergency," which includes the Iran Nonproliferation Amendments Act of 2005 and the ironically named Iran Freedom Support Act of 2006.
  10. Swiss Reject Climate Change Eurointelligence reports Swiss Reject Climate Change After Switzerland dropped its negotiations with the EU, the country has now rejected a climate-protection law in a referendum. Concretely, they rejected all three parts of the law in separate votes: on CO2, on pesticides, and on drinking water. We agree with the Swiss journalist Mathieu von Rohr that this failure is not merely important in its own right, but symptomatic for the difficulties facing Green politics in general. It is one thing for people to pretend they support the Green party, especially when it is cool to do so. It is quite another to make actual sacrifices as the Swiss were asked to do. But what is particularly interesting about this referendum is that the strongest opposition came from young people. 60-70% of the 18-34 year old voted No in the three categories. Each country is different, but the big yet unanswered question is whether people elsewhere would agree to make personal...
  11. Researchers are starting to investigate the species that drive alpine algal blooms to better understand their causes and effects. Winter through spring, the French Alps are wrapped in austere white snow. But as spring turns to summer, the stoic slopes start to blush. Parts of the snow take on bright colors: deep red, rusty orange, lemonade pink. Locals call this "sang de glacier," or "glacier blood." Visitors sometimes go with "watermelon snow." In reality, these blushes come from an embarrassment of algae. In recent years, alpine habitats all over the world have experienced an uptick in snow algae blooms — dramatic, strangely hued aggregations of these normally invisible creatures. While snow algae blooms are poorly understood, that they are happening is probably not a good sign. Researchers have begun surveying the algae of the Alps to better grasp what species live there, how they survive and what might be pushing them over the bleeding edge. Some of their initial findings were...
  12. Publicly, US authorities have rigidly stuck to the story that no one saw the January 6 Capitol ruckus coming. But the publication of internal documents is casting further doubt on the established version of events. On June 21, NBC News reported on a recent court filing that raises further questions about whether the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) foresaw what happened in Washington DC on January 6 and, if so, why the agency failed to sound the alarm in good time. The document in question is an FBI investigative report on social media activity prior to that fateful day, produced in February, showing that enraged Donald Trump supporters were openly talking about bringing firearms to the Capitol in order to instigate a "revolution." The offending posts were used as justification to launch a probe into protest attendee Thomas Webster, a former New York Police Department officer, who was indicted the following month for attacking a Capitol Police officer.
  13. When 21-year-old North Korean defector, Yeonmi Park, made her debut on the world stage in October this year with harrowing tales of life under the repressive North Korean regime and her perilous escape to freedom, she left audiences, human rights heavyweights, and journalists in tears - some literally sobbing. Wearing a pink, traditional Korean dress with its high waist and voluminous skirt, Park stood before the lectern at the One Young World Summit in Dublin and in between long pauses, wiping tears from her eyes and holding her hand to her mouth as she composed herself, she told of being brainwashed; of seeing executions; of starving; of the slither of light in her darkness when she watched the Hollywood blockbuster Titanic, and had her mind opened to the outside world where love was possible; of having to watch her mother being raped; of burying her father on her own at just 14; and of threatening to kill herself rather than allow Mongolian soldiers to send her back to North...
  14. Let me introduce you to Ophiojura, a bizarre deep-sea animal found in 2011 by scientists from the French Natural History Museum, while trawling the summit of a secluded seamount called Banc Durand, 500 metres below the waves and 200 kilometres east of New Caledonia in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Ophiojura is a type of brittle star, which are distant cousins of starfish, with snake-like arms radiating from their bodies, that live on sea floors around the globe. Being an expert in deep-sea animals, I knew at a glance that this one was special when I first saw it in 2015. The eight arms, each 10 centimetres long and armed with rows of hooks and spines. And the teeth! A microscopic scan revealed bristling rows of sharp teeth lining every jaw, which I reckon are used to snare and shred its prey.
  15. Nicholas Giordano joins Tucker Carlson on Fox News to discuss how the Biden Manual on Fighting Domestic Terrorism can easily be abused. This is an extremely important segment that exposes the vagueness of the document, and how it can be manipulated and used against political opponents. The Department of Justice's National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism should concern every American regardless of political affiliation, and the text of the document proves that even the most casual critic of the government could be ensnared, and therefore be labeled as a domestic terrorist. This four-minute clip just scratches the surface. On June 23, Professor Giordano will break down the document, going page-by-page, showing just how dangerous it is, how it can easily be manipulated and exploited, what will happen if it is fully implemented, and why it shouldn't matter what your political affiliation is.
  16. On the 80th anniversary of the start of Operation Barbarossa, the German-led WW2 military invasion of the Soviet Union, Ukraine's leading opposition party has demanded that authorities in Kiev finally ban neo-Nazi organizations. In a statement published on its website on Tuesday, the Opposition Platform - For Life party also asked the Ukrainian government to stop "rewriting history." Back in April, Ukrainian nationalists held a march in the center of Kiev to mark the anniversary of the creation of the SS Galicia during World War II. The SS division was made up predominantly of Ukrainian volunteers who took up arms for Nazi Germany against the Soviet Union, and who mainly fought against local partisans. The unit was almost wiped out in the 1944 Battle of Lvov-Sandomierz, and later saw action in Slovakia and Austria. In 1945, it rebranded as the Ukrainian National Army and lasted until the end of the war in May that year. The march in Kiev was condemned by officials from Russia,...
  17. President Rodrigo Duterte has threatened to jail people who refuse to be vaccinated against the coronavirus as the Philippines battles one of Asia's worst outbreaks, with a cumulative total of more than 1.3 million cases and 23,000 deaths. "You choose, vaccine or I will have you jailed," Duterte said in a televised address on Monday following reports of low turnouts at several vaccination sites in the capital Manila. Duterte's remarks contradict those of his health officials, who have said that while people are being urged to receive the Covid-19 vaccine, it was voluntary. "Don't get me wrong, there is a crisis in this country," Duterte said. "I'm just exasperated by Filipinos not heeding the government." As of Sunday, Philippine authorities had fully vaccinated 2.1 million people, making slow progress towards the government's target of up to 70 million of the country's 110 million people. Duterte, who has been criticised for his tough approach to containing the virus, also stood...
  18. Saturday, during an appearance on CNN, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) suggested the Trump campaign played a role in the January 6 Capitol Hill riot. Waters made those remarks when asked by CNN's Jim Acosta to react to what he called Republicans blaming the FBI. "They can say whatever they want to say," Waters declared. "One of the things we know is we need a commission, and they are opposing a commission to find out who all was involved. Where did the money come from to send busloads of people in? Who supported them in all of this? Where was the organizing taking place? I'm told there was organizing taking place right in the Trump campaign. And so, if they are really concerned about why our Capitol was invaded and why there was an insurrection, they would support a commission to find out. But they don't want to know because too many of them side with them and support what they have done, and they are not going to call them to task for it." "It is outrageous what happened to us, that the...
  19. "You're not a doctor!" How many times have we had this appeal to authority thrown in our faces when trying to make an argument against the dominant narrative of the day? The authoritarian mindset will only accept arguments, no matter how logical and well-reasoned, if they're coming from the mouth of a properly respected authority figure, like a doctor. This is why it is so valuable when doctors speak out against the narratives of the day. When an authority figure comes forward with narrative shattering info, at least some people (those not too under the spell of the talking heads in the mainstream media) might actually take notice and may even start to think. On this episode of Objective:Health, we look at some of the brave doctors who have stepped up to speak publicly about the failures of the Covid narrative. For other health-related news and more, you can find us on: ♥Twitter: https://twitter.com/objecthealth ♥Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/objecthealth/ ♥Brighteon:...
  20. I got to thinking about how science progresses. Science is a funny beast. It's not a "thing", it's a process. The process works like this: One or more people make a falsifiable claim about how the physical world works. They support it with logic, math, computer code, examples, experience, experimental results, thought experiments, or other substantiating backup information.They make all of that information public, so others can replicate their work.Other people try to find things that are wrong with the original claim, including errors in the logic, math, computer code, examples, and the rest.If someone can show the original claim is wrong, that claim is falsified and rejected.If nobody can show the claim is wrong, then it is provisionally accepted as scientifically valid... but only provisionally, because at any time new information of any kind may show that the claim actually is wrong.Note that there is two things that must be present for this process we call "science" to work....
  21. An article by the President of Russia has been published in the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit and is timed to coincide with the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Great Patriotic war. On June 22, 1941, exactly 80 years ago, the Nazis, having conquered practically the whole of Europe, attacked the USSR. For the Soviet people the Great Patriotic War - the bloodiest one in the history of our country - began. Tens of millions of people lost their lives, the economic potential of the country and its cultural property were severely damaged. We are proud of the courage and steadfastness of the heroes of the Red Army and home front workers who not only defended the independence and dignity of our homeland, but also saved Europe and the world from enslavement. Despite attempts to rewrite the pages of the past that are being made today, the truth is that Soviet soldiers came to Germany not to take revenge on the Germans, but with a noble and great mission of liberation. We hold...
  22. Biologists at the University of Bath and the University of Vienna in Austria have discovered 71 new imprinted genes in the mouse genome. Biologists at the Universities of Bath and Vienna have discovered 71 new 'imprinted' genes in the mouse genome, a finding that takes them a step closer to unravelling some of the mysteries of epigenetics - an area of science that describes how genes are switched on (and off) in different cells at different stages in development and adulthood. To understand the importance of imprinted genes to inheritance, we need to step back and ask how inheritance works in general. Most of the thirty trillion cells in a person's body contain genes that come from both their mother and father, with each parent contributing one version of each gene. The unique combination of genes goes part of the way to making an individual unique. Usually, each gene in a pair is equally active or inactive in a given cell. This is not the case for imprinted genes. These genes -...
  23. Worthy of an apocalyptic scene. A waterspout was observed on Monday June 21, 2021 around 6 p.m., not far from the town of Notre-Dame-de-Gravenchon, close to Havre (Seine-Maritime). On social networks, Internet users have relayed impressive photos and videos of the phenomenon, which usually occurs in stormy weather.
  24. Zug is the largest town and capital of the Swiss canton of Zug in Switzerland. Its name originates from the fishing vocabulary; in the Middle Ages it referred to the right to pull up fishing nets and hence to the right to fish. The municipality had a total population of 30,618 in 31 December 2019.
  25. Heavy rain causes torrential floods in Beauvais, Hauts-de-France, France. June 21st 2021.
  26. A dead whale washed up at Ocean Beach in San Francisco Monday. The mammal was found floating in the surf. Experts conducted a necropsy Monday afternoon to determine the whale's cause of death. This is the 17th whale to wash ashore in the San Francisco Bay this year. In April, four whales were found dead on Bay Area shores in just over a week.
  27. Osage County deputy sheriffs were dispatched Saturday, June 19, to an address west of Skiatook. They were carrying out a welfare check on an individual identified as Rebecca McCurdy, 28, who was reportedly house sitting and taking care of the homeowner's dogs. When the deputies arrived at the home, they found McCurdy deceased. Her body was reportedly in the garage, and the Sheriff's Office said in a news release that evidence observed at the scene "indicates Rebecca was the victim of a dog attack." "The homeowner claimed he raised pit bull dogs for hobby/sale," the Sheriff's Office said. "There were several pit bull dogs caged in the garage. One of the dog cages was toppled over and there were many signs of a dog attack visible." Osage County Sheriff's Office investigators continued to look into the incident as they waited for results from the Oklahoma State Medical Examiner's Office. The dogs suspected of vicious activity were taken by the Sheriff's Office and were being held...
  28. China has a choice of either giving in to the Western powers' demand and allowing another WHO-led probe into Covid-19's origin or being ostracized by the international community, Joe Biden's security adviser Jake Sullivan warned. The US president's national security adviser issued the stern warning to China during an interview with Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday. Asked whether Biden intends to insist that a potential second probe into the origins of the virus must be an "independent" investigation, Sullivan said that the president had convinced Washington's allies in the G7 to pile pressure on Beijing. "It is that diplomatic spadework - rallying the nations of the world, imposing political and diplomatic pressure on China, that is a core part of the effort we are undertaking to ultimately face China with a stark choice," Sullivan said.
  29. A species of butterfly found in Sub-Saharan Africa is able to migrate thousands of miles to Europe, crossing the Saharan Desert, in years when weather conditions are favorable, scientists have found. The striking Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui) butterfly has been shown for the first time to be capable of making the 12,000-14,000 km round trip — the longest insect migration known so far — in greater numbers, when wetter conditions in the desert help the plants on which it lays eggs. The international research team's findings increase understanding of how insects, including pollinators, pests and the diseases they carry could spread between continents in future as climate change alters seasonal conditions. Comment: Indeed. We are not seeing 'global warming' as mainstream science continues to claim, although this slogan is slowly being phased out because it's undeniable that, amongst other Earth Changes, our planet cooling, and that includes increasingly erratic seasons that are...
  30. Here is the full statement by current CDC Senior Scientist on Vaccine-Autism questions: Dr. William Thompson. Stay tuned to this website for an update on the story, soon. I regret that my [CDC] coauthors and I omitted statistically significant information in our 2004 article published in the Journal of Pediatrics. My primary job duties while working in the immunization safety branch from 2000 to 2006 were to lead or colead three major vaccine safety studies. The MADDSP MMR-Autism Cases Control Study was being carried out in response to the Wakefield Lancet study that suggested an association between the MMR vaccine and an autism-like health outcome. There were several major concerns among scientists and consumer advocates outside the CDC in the fall of 2000 regarding the execution of the Verstraeten study.
  31. Iran's atomic energy body says the country's sole nuclear power plant has been temporarily shut down over a "technical fault." "Following a technical fault at Bushehr power plant, and after a one-day notice to the Energy Ministry, the plant was temporarily shut down and taken off the power grid," the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran said on its website overnight. The agency added that the power plant in the southern port city of Bushehr will be reconnected to the national electricity network "within the next few days" after the issue is resolved.
  32. CNN anchor Don Lemon had some unfavorable remarks about the United States and Americans in a new interview. The left-wing cable TV host made a bizarre claim that Americans don't see black people as human beings, and declared that the U.S. needs to "realize just how racist it is." Lemon gave an in-depth interview for the Washington Post Magazine's Sunday feature. Reporter Eric Easter asked Lemon, "You've suggested that Trump was the president we deserved and probably a necessary and revealing wake-up call. Do you still think that?" Lemon responded, "Considering people's apathy to get involved in the political process, to pay attention to the political process, to go to the polls, their willingness to give so much attention to celebrity, I think that's what I meant by 'the president we deserve.'"
  33. Whenever the woke diversity and inclusion agenda fails a test, it's always the test's fault - never the test-taker's. It started in 2020, when the Academy Awards put new rules into place that required future films to be diverse and inclusive in order to qualify for nomination. Now, to bolster that diversity and inclusion agenda, the woke enemies of merit in art and entertainment have set their sights on eliminating box office receipts as a measure of cinematic success. 'In the Heights', a musical with an Asian director, Latino writer and all-minority cast, made a measly $11 million at the box office in its opening weekend, instead of the $25 to $50 million some delusional fools were projecting. It's looking as if it will make considerably less in week two, but, apparently, we need to ignore its failure to sell tickets and laud its inclusivity aims.
  34. Saudi Arabia has agreed to restart oil aid to Pakistan in an effort to steer Islamabad away from Iranian influence, Pakistani officials told the Financial Times. A senior Pakistani official told the newspaper that the deal, worth at least $1.5bn annually, would restart in July after the previous oil credit of $3.4bn was put on hold last year when ties frayed. "Our relations with Saudi Arabia have recovered from [a downturn] earlier," the senior Pakistani official said.
  35. The publishing world's in danger of becoming a no-go area for freedom of expression. The delayed publication of a history text, amended after it was deemed "too white," is proof of that. There's a veritable army of freelance censors and sensitivity entrepreneurs enlisted in the policing of culture. Poor Richard Cohen. The British author's book, titled 'The History Makers', was due out earlier this month before being serialised on BBC Radio 4. Promoted as an "epic exploration of who writes the past", it had already been a target of cultural policing by Random House. The American publisher had previously demanded that Cohen rewrite part of his 800-page tome on the grounds that he failed to include a sufficiently large quota of black historians and academics. Yet, despite the rewrite, it decided to cancel his contract.
  36. The Swedish National Museum is under fire for attaching "warning labels" to classic pieces of art, tipping viewers off about the dangerous "nationalism," racism, and "patriarchal gender roles" apparently hidden on canvas. From reimagining its viking warriors as "transgender" to hanging homosexual art in its churches, to declaring its own history "copied," Swedish society has apparently committed itself to a full-throttle woke makeover in recent years. The Swedish National Museum in Stockholm is no different. Since it reopened in 2018, audiences soon noticed new, "politicized" labels on paintings. Archaeologist Leif Gren reviewed them last week in an opinion piece for Vestmanlands Lans Tidning, concluding that museum officials weren't letting visitors "think for themselves."
  37. A 13-year-old boy allegedly died from heart problems after getting his second dose of Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine, according to a viral Twitter post, as health officials begin to link cases of heart inflammation in kids to the jabs. A Twitter thread went viral on Sunday after a woman claimed that her brother's 13-year-old son had died less than three days after receiving his second dose of Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine. "The initial autopsy results (done Friday) were that his heart was enlarged and there was some fluid surrounding it. He had no known health problems. Was on no medications," Tami Burages wrote, with a photo apparently showing her nephew's Covid-19 vaccination record card.
  38. Governments are using fear to control and manipulate their citizens. That has now been admitted by members of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behavior (SPI-B), a subcommittee that advises the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) in the U.K. And they should know, because they advocated for it, and now say it was a regrettable mistake. As reported by The Telegraph, May 14, 2021:1 "Scientists on a committee that encouraged the use of fear to control people's behavior during the COVID pandemic have admitted its work was 'unethical' and 'totalitarian.' Members of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behavior (SPI-B) expressed regret about the tactics in a new book about the role of psychology in the Government's COVID-19 response. SPI-B warned in March last year that ministers needed to increase 'the perceived level of personal threat' from COVID-19 because 'a substantial number of people still do not feel sufficiently personally threatened.' Gavin Morgan, a...
  39. Several of the world's leading scientists plan to launch an independent expert group this week to advise, warn and criticise global policymakers about the climate and nature crises. The new body has been inspired by Independent Sage - the cluster of British scientists who have held UK ministers and civil servants to account for their lack of transparency and mishandling of the Covid pandemic. Comment: Remember these are pretty much the same guys that want even more lockdowns. So, by their definition, the 'mishandling' of the pandemic is that the government didn't go hard enough. The Climate Crisis Advisory Group, comprising 14 experts from 10 nations and every continent, aims to have more of an international reach and provide the global public with regular analysis about efforts to tackle the global heating and biodiversity crises. Headed by the former UK chief scientific adviser Sir David King, the new group will issue monthly updates about the state of the global environment at...
  40. Just over a year ago, I stumbled across an intriguing scientific paper. It suggested the pandemic that was ripping around the world was "uniquely adapted to infect humans"; it was "not typical of a normal zoonotic infection" since it first appeared with "exceptional" ability to enter human cells. The author of the paper, Nikolai Petrovsky, was frank about the disease when we spoke back then, saying its adaptability was either "a remarkable coincidence or a sign of human intervention". He even broke the scientific omertà by daring to admit that "no one can say a laboratory leak is not a possibility". But even though Petrovsky has excellent credentials — professor of medicine at a prominent Australian university, author of more than 200 papers in scientific journals and founder of a company funded by the US government to develop new vaccine technologies — I was still anxious when my story went global. His original document had been posted on a pre-print site, so had not been peer...
  41. A week ago, noctilucent clouds (NLCs) were stuck inside the Arctic Circle. Suddenly, they have broken free. Over the weekend, people saw the clouds through the city lights of Paris, Madrid, Berlin and other European capitals. On June 20th, Francisco Gil photographed NLCs as far south as Valencia, Spain. "It is pretty strange to observe noctilucent clouds from these latitudes," says Gil. Indeed it is. Valencia is at +39N, a latitude where NLCs are almost never seen. For most of their history (NLCs were discovered in the 19th century), the clouds have been found mainly near the Arctic Circle. Now they are spreading. The record low latitude, to date, was set in June 2019 when the clouds appeared near Los Angeles (+34 N). Gil's sighting shows that they are in the 30s again. This just in: Cameras at the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain recorded the clouds at an even lower altitude (+37.5N):
  42. Heavy downpours triggered floods in parts of Flanders last night. In Wallonia, strong gusts of wind caused a lot of damage in the municipality of Beauraing, where there are reports of 17 injured people. Beauraing is talking of a "mini-tornado". As many as 92 houses were severely damaged, 10 have been declared unfit for habitation. Over a dozen cars were damaged. Comment: There's no such thing as a mini-tornado. This was a powerful 'full-grown' tornado. The only reason we can't report where it fell on the EF scale is because Belgium doesn't track such things because tornadoes are (or used to be) so rare there. Beauraing, a town in Namur province, was hardest hit. The local disaster plan was started after what local authorities are labelling as "a small tornado". 17 people sustained light injuries and some 90 homes were heavily damaged, Beauraing announced in a press report. The local cultural centre offers shelter for those that sustained damage. Several people got injured when an...
  43. I always get vaccinated. I have been fully vaccinated with the Moderna COVID vaccine. My three daughters have all been vaccinated. I recently learned that these vaccines have likely killed over 25,800 Americans (which I confirmed 3 different ways) and disabled at least 1,000,000 more. And we're only halfway to the finish line. We need to PAUSE these vaccines NOW before more people are killed. The CDC, FDA, and NIH aren't disclosing how many people have been killed or disabled from the COVID vaccines. The mainstream media isn't asking any questions; they are playing along. YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and others are all censoring content that goes against the "perfectly safe" narrative so nobody is the wiser. Tony Fauci, the "father of COVID," is still in his job even though all of this is his fault. Cliff Lane, who reports to Tony, is still sandbagging early treatments so that people will falsely believe that the vaccine is the only option. The Democrats are still asleep at the...
  44. Of all the questions asked, words spoken, and ink spilled on the so-called "Capitol Siege" of January 6, 2021, none hold the key to the entire event quite like the question Sen. Amy Klobuchar asked of Christopher Wray. The Democrat from Minnesota asked the Trump-appointed FBI Director: Did the federal government infiltrate any of the so-called "militia" organizations claimed to be responsible for planning and executing the Capitol Siege? The full segment is available on YouTube. Christopher Wray is able to uncomfortably weasel his way out of answering the question directly, partially because Klobuchar does him the courtesy of not asking him the question directly. Klobuchar instead asks the FBI director if he wishes he had infiltrated the militia organizations allegedly involved in 1/6 — assuming from the outset that there was in fact no infiltration, thereby providing the FBI director an easy way to avoid addressing the question one way or another.
  45. Last month Nancy Pelosi, the Speaker of the House, assured a pro-Israel Jewish audience that the arrival of Congresswomen Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar (and maybe also Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez) as critics of Israel would not affect the U.S. relationship with Israel. "Remove all doubt in your mind. It's just a question of not paying attention to a few people who may want to go their own way, but as far as our Congress is concerned we try very hard to unify, to have bipartisanship in all of this... If you hear of one person or another- it's not about anything other than perhaps their individual vote." But Pelosi also acknowledged the pressure from the left, when she called for a two state solution, and there were jeers from the right wing crowd. "The principles we would hope to see there are a two state solution- [jeers]. I know there's controversy but the extreme left on this is asking for a one-state solution- so understand we have to strike the balance...." That was surely an...
  46. The party of Armenia's prime minister, Nikol Pashinyan, has won 53.9% of the vote in snap parliamentary polls called in an effort to defuse a political crisis after a war with Azerbaijan, official results show. An alliance led by his rival, ex-leader Robert Kocharyan, came second with 21%, according to the results based on ballots from 100%t of precincts counted. A winning party or bloc needs to obtain at least 50% of seats plus one and can be assigned additional seats in order to form a government. Pashinyan hours earlier claimed victory based on early results, but Kocharyan's grouping swiftly contested the vote and alleged election fraud. A record four electoral blocs and 21 parties ran for election on Sunday. The vote has been seen as a two-horse race, with both Pashinyan, 46, and Kocharyan, 66, drawing massive crowds in the run-up to the polls. Pashinyan announced early on Monday: "The people of Armenia gave our Civil Contract party a mandate to lead the country and personally...
  47. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis edged former President Trump in a weekend presidential straw poll conducted at the annual Western Conservative Summit in Denver. Mr. DeSantis received 74.12% support in response to a poll asking conference attendees to "vote for all candidates you approve of for President in 2024," followed by Mr. Trump, who garnered 71.43% support, according to results issued Saturday. The survey of 371 respondents released at the end of the two-day summit offered an unscientific but intriguing glimpse at how conservative voters are leaning well ahead of the 2024 presidential race. Coming in third behind the two Florida Republicans was Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Republican, who received 42.86% support, followed by former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo with 39.35%, and Sen. Tim Scott, South Carolina Republican, with 35.58%. Other GOP figures receiving support in descending order were South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem; Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas; Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky; Donald...
  48. Jon Stewart is the High Priest of Barely Functional Millennials. Not all Millennials, just the ones he's personally destroyed. I've hated him from the moment my younger friends/family told me they got their news from him rather than you know, the news. And saying this is not an endorsement of the news, then or now. Stewart's agitprop was the stuff of legend during his run on The Daily Show. He programmed an entire generation to think he was the truth-telling court jester when he was really always The Davos Crowd's Pied Piper. All he had to do was bust open a few easily-busted lies while mugging for the camera. That's instant credibility with a generation incapable of real critical thinking. He was funny when he got his first break on Dennis Miller Live on HBO back in the early 90's. I didn't have cable back then and had a co-worker tape them for me. Stewart stood out. He's a talented guy, always has been. I don't begrudge him his talent. It's one of the hallmarks of evil people,...
  49. Portland Police Association Executive Director Daryl Turner argued on Fox News Live Sunday that elected officials "encouraged and enabled some of the violence'" that was taking place over the more than 150 nights of riots in Portland, explaining part of the reason why all 50 members of the Portland police riot squad known as the Rapid Response Team (RRT) resigned. A Portland Police Bureau (PPB) statement indicated that the resignations were effective as of last Wednesday, and it's unclear what implications would be for law enforcement response to future demonstrations in Portland, although Turner stressed that the officers have resigned from their voluntary positions on the Rapid Response Team, but will "still be doing the same job" and will "be ordered to do the same job, just a little bit different." Portland Deputy Police Chief Chris Davis had said that the police department will make sure that there are "as close to adequate resources as we can get within just the limits that...
  50. On the Dark Horse Podcast, Dr. Robert Malone, creator of mRNA vaccine technology, said the COVID vaccine lipid nanoparticles — which tell the body to produce the spike protein — leave the injection site and accumulate in organs and tissues. On June 10, Dr. Robert Malone, creator of mRNA vaccine technology, joined evolutionary biologist Bret Weinstein, Ph.D., for a 3-hour conversation on the Dark Horse Podcast to discuss multiple safety concerns related to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. In this short outtake from the full podcast, Malone, Weinstein and tech entrepreneur Steve Kirsch touch on the implications of the controversial Japanese Pfizer biodistribution study. The study was made public earlier this month by Dr. Byram Bridle, a viral immunologist. They also discuss the lack of proper animal studies for the new mRNA vaccines, and the theory, espoused by virologist Geert Vanden Bossche, Ph.D., that mass vaccination with the mRNA vaccines could produce ever more transmissible...