Signs Of The Times RSS

Signs of the Times: The World for People who Think. Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on world events.
Signs of the Times
  1. Health officials in Los Angeles County have declared a new "safer-at-home" order, clamping down its Covid-19 restrictions to ban most gatherings for a three-week period, but created exemptions for religious services and protests. The new directive, which will take effect next week and stay in force until December 20, will prohibit all public and private gatherings involving people from different households and impose further occupancy limits on businesses, the county health department announced on Friday. Residents are advised to stay home as much as possible and always wear a face covering over their nose and mouth when they are outside their household and around others.
  2. With idle tales this fills our empty ears; The next reports what from the first he hears; The rolling fictions grow in strength and size, Each author adding to the former lies. Here vain credulity, with new desires, Leads us astray, and groundless joy inspires; The dubious whispers, tumults fresh designed, And chilling fears astound the anxious mind. -Ovid's Metamorphosis While the foundations of the USA tremble under the force of unprecedented vote fraud, color revolutionary operations, and the danger of a renewed fascist takeover of the Wall Street-Big Tech-NSA/FBI/CIA combine, certain facts must be separated from fiction. Despite the mainstream media announcements of Biden's victory, the fact is that things are far from certain as President Trump has made the point that he will fight all cases of blatant vote fraud which have appeared across 8 states. Despite mainstream media assertions to the contrary, there are indeed growing mountains of evidence that vote fraud has occurred...
  3. Boris Johnson faces a potentially perilous battle to get England's new coronavirus tiers plan through parliament after dozens of Conservative MPs protested at the curbs for their areas and demanded to see the evidence behind them. Some MPs predicted that, without significant change between now and Tuesday, when the vote on the system to replace the current England-wide lockdown takes place, as many as 70 Conservatives could vote against the plan or abstain. This could mean relying on Labour for the vote - which takes place on the day the lockdown lapses under law - to pass. Particular vehemence came from Tories who found their areas moved from tier 1 under the pre-lockdown system to tier 2 or, in the case of Kent, to the most rigorous restrictions of tier 3 starting at 00.01 on Wednesday 2 December.
  4. WHILE local man David O'Brien hopes beyond hope that the metal monolith found in Utah is some alien message, deep down his deep rooted cynicism prevents him from presuming anything other than it definitely being a predictable and 'shitty publicity stunt for a game or some shit'. "I want an acid spewing tentacled murder machine from mars to burst out of that monolith and rip the spine clean out of the bodies of those it encounters as much as the next guy, but this has lame Playstation 5 promotion or Netflix sci-fi movie marketing written all over it," offered O'Brien, whose dyed in the wool jaded disaffection denied him more than 5 seconds of childlike wonder.
  5. The periodic table of the elements, principally created by the Russian chemist, Dmitry Mendeleev (1834-1907), celebrated its 150th anniversary last year. It would be hard to overstate its importance as an organising principle in chemistry - all budding chemists become familiar with it from the earliest stages of their education. Given the table's importance, one might be forgiven for thinking that the ordering of the elements were no longer subject to debate. However, two scientists in Moscow, Russia, have recently published a proposal for a new order. Let's first consider how the periodic table was developed. By the late 18th century, chemists were clear about the difference between an element and a compound: elements were chemically indivisible (examples are hydrogen, oxygen) whereas compounds consisted of two or more elements in combination, having properties quite distinct from their component elements. By the early 19th century, there was good circumstantial evidence for the...
  6. Berlin will no longer be required to ensure that US drone strikes coordinated through an air base in Germany are in line with international law, a top court has ruled, in a "severe blow" to a case brought by human rights groups. The Federal Administrative Court in Leipzig concluded that the government has no obligation to guarantee US strikes are in line with humanitarian law beyond basic assurances from US authorities, overturning a ruling from last year that made Berlin partially responsible for such operations. The case was brought in 2014 by human rights groups on behalf of three Yemeni plaintiffs, who charge that family members were killed by American drones in 2012, and that those strikes used flight control data relayed through the US air base in Ramstein, Germany. One of the plaintiffs, Faisal bin Ali Jaber, called Wednesday's ruling a "severe blow."
  7. The Belarusian authorities have called for a national assembly of thousands of people late next month or in January 2021 to discuss proposed constitutional changes. Belarus has been rocked by protests since an August 9 presidential election handed Lukashenka a sixth term amid allegations of widespread fraud. Protesters say opposition candidate Svyatlana Tsikhanouskaya was the real winner of the vote. Ahead of the August election, Tsikhanouskaya had said that if she's elected president, she'd organize a referendum to bring back the 1994 constitution that limited presidential powers.
  8. President Donald Trump called Thursday for the "immediate" termination of Section 230, the portion of law granting internet companies immunity from certain lawsuits. Trump made the comment amid speculation that his administration is planning a flurry of executive actions before President-elect Joe Biden takes office in January. Trump argues Section 230 must be abolished "for purposes of National Security." It is unclear how Section 230 relates to national security, however. The law prevents all internet companies from being held legally liable for the third party content their users post on their site. It also protects those companies from being sued for how they moderate that content. Trump and Republicans have argued for years that social media giants like Facebook and Twitter were abusing the immunity to silence conservative voices on their sites.
  9. Yeezy come, Yeezy go. Kanye West won't be appearing on the presidential ballot for his home state after election officials in Illinois found that 1,900 of the 3,128 signatures West submitted are invalid. That leaves the rapper short of the 2,500 needed to be included on the state's Presidential ballot. While no reason was given, issues could be fake names or addresses, voters who were not eligible in Illinois, illegible signatures or something else entirely, TMZ notes. The signatures were brought to the attention of the Illinois State Board of Elections after three people filed objections citing dodgy signatures, the site reported. West reportedly dropped $30,000 to be included on the ballot. Meanwhile Wisconsin is looking into West's presidential bid in that state after Democratic party members found signatures for "Mickey Mouse" and Bernie Sanders on that state's ballot. "If the affidavits are true... crimes were committed by the West campaign," attorney Michael Maistelman, who...
  10. An analysis of Nevada votes has uncovered an unprecedented jump in problem voter registrations, likely providing the Trump campaign with another avenue to challenge Joe Biden's victory in the critical state. In an affidavit filed in another Republican election challenge, a "data scientist" found a huge surge of incomplete voter registrations and those giving casinos and temporary RV parks as "their home or mailing addresses" in the Third Congressional District that covers the southern third of the state and much of Clark County. Comment: Matt Braynard's team found similar illegal registrations in Pennsylvania and Georgia, not to mention the bogus "indefinitely confined" absentee ballot voters in Wisconsin. The expert, Dorothy Morgan, said that in her initial study of the records of those who voted, there was an "historically strange" jump in voter registrations missing the sex and age of the voter, making confirmation by poll workers impossible. She found that in the last...
  11. Outgoing Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard has urged President Donald Trump to issue pardons for Edward Snowden and Julian Assange, echoing growing calls to absolve whistleblowers who helped to "expose" the US "deep state." "Since you're giving pardons to people, please consider pardoning those who, at great personal sacrifice, exposed the deception and criminality of those in the deep state," Gabbard said in a tweet addressed to the president on Thursday, referring to Snowden and Assange.
  12. Vermont Gov. Phil Scott is giving schools the green light to interrogate students about their Thanksgiving activities following the break. According to Scott, students or parents who admit to violating the state's holiday travel and gathering rules will be forced to participate in online school for two weeks, he announced via Twitter on Tuesday. The penalty will be reduced to one week if the students in question take a COVID-19 test. The same quarantine method, Scott claimed, should apply to businesses whose employees decided to celebrate the Thanksgiving holidays with friends and family.
  13. It's unclear why the Trump administration waited until its final months to shake up the influential group of outside experts advising top Pentagon leaders. Several members of the top federal advisory committee to the U.S. Department of Defense have been suddenly pushed out, multiple U.S. officials told Foreign Policy, in what appears to be the outgoing Trump administration's parting shot at scions of the foreign-policy establishment. The directive, which the Pentagon's White House liaison Joshua Whitehouse sent on Wednesday afternoon, removes 11 high-profile advisors from the Defense Policy Board, including former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and Madeleine Albright; retired Adm. Gary Roughead, who served as chief of naval operations; and a onetime ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, Jane Harman. Rudy De Leon, a former chief operating officer at the Pentagon once considered by then-Defense Secretary James Mattis for a high-level policy role, will also be...
  14. Adamson Barbecue owner Adam Skelly has been arrested after opening his restaurant in direct defiance of lockdown orders in Toronto, with a crowd of BBQ lovers shouting 'shame!' as officers dragged him away. The barbecue restaurant and Skelly himself became the center of controversy this week after he announced in an Instagram video on Tuesday that he was opening his doors. He also questioned lockdown orders and whether Covid-19 cases were being inflated.
  15. Significant evidence of vote fraud was revealed through data analysis and investigations by Matt Braynard, executive director of Look Ahead America. We had the pleasure of sitting down with Matt Braynard to look over his data and discuss his findings.
  16. As forecast, the Costa Blanca was hit by storms this week. The unstable weather was also responsible for a dramatic waterspout off the Alicante coast shortly before 2pm on Friday November 27 that was visible from Playa de San Juan, Muchavista and Campello for 15 minutes. It finally touched land in Campello's Rincon de la Zofra, damaging benches and paving on the seafront at Rincon de la Zofra on the Muchavista beach.
  17. Barack Obama has taken a swipe at Hispanic voters who chose Donald Trump, accusing them of ignoring the US president's "racist" comments. The ex-US president argued some overlooked Mr Trump's rhetoric because they supported his anti-abortion stance. Mr Obama also criticised undocumented migrants being held in "cages", a practice that began in his presidency. Exit polls show Mr Trump won a larger percentage of Hispanics than in 2016. The Republican president garnered about 32% of the demographic in 2020, up from 28% four years ago.
  18. The long-running gay magazine Boyz has endured a blistering attack and a loss of supporters, after some innocuous activity on social media gravely upset a few members of the militant trans lobby. We seem to have blinked and opened our eyes to a different world. That's Planet Trans, where gender identity is forcibly injected into any situation. As a byproduct, a nasty army of activists are lying in wait to bite any person or platform who refuses to submit to their self-serving ideology. Distilled down, it's that trans-sexuals are the most important part and pinnacle of the movement to end discrimination. These zealots really are fanatical, as seen by their attack on Boyz, a monthly gay magazine which has existed since 1991.
  19. A lawsuit released by lawyers led by former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell makes 30 allegations of electoral fraud and other illegal and irregular activities and features pertaining to the 2020 general elections in Georgia (pdf). The allegations, most of which are based on witness and expert statements, relate to mail-in ballot fraud and insecurities, recount irregularities and deficiencies, and security hazards of the Dominion Voting Systems machines used by the state.
  20. Canberra failed to deal with atrocities laid bare in a report which found that elite special forces' murder of prisoners and innocent civilians in Afghanistan was "disgraceful." Sadly, the guilty will probably get away with it. The Australian government's handling of the Afghanistan war crimes scandal has been an utter shambles and, as a result, those responsible are likely to escape punishment entirely. The Brereton report, handed down last week in redacted form, found that some unnamed 25 soldiers in the elite Australian special forces had committed 39 murders while on duty in Afghanistan. Brereton correctly described this as "a disgraceful and profound betrayal."
  21. After months of carnage in US cities, tensions are rising between the two main perpetrators, Antifa and Black Lives Matter. Given their different ethnic make-ups and agendas, it's a shock this unholy alliance lasted so long. If there are two organizations that can be held most responsible for the riots that have scarred America throughout 2020, it is Black Lives Matter and Antifa. These groups have caused millions upon millions of dollars' worth of damage and committed hundreds of crimes in the pursuit of what they consider 'justice'. I know the true end game for these groups is not the election of Joe Biden, but I get the sense that they're at least happy that Donald Trump is going to be out of office (barring the biggest case of voter fraud in history). And with that small victory, it would appear that a divorce is under way between the two groups.
  22. This particular case involved claims that seven Pennsylvania counties and the Secretary of the Commonwealth inappropriately allowed voters who submitted defective mail-in ballots to "cure" the defect by voting a provisional ballot on election day. The issues in the case involve whether such a "curing" process is allowable under Pennsylvania law, and whether the actions by the counties and the Secretary of the Commonwealth caused an "injury" to the Plaintiffs by expanding the opportunity for registered voters to cast their ballots. This case was always going to end up in a dismissal based on a lack of standing on the part of the Plaintiffs to assert the type of claims they were bringing. The controlling case law at the appellate court level dictated the outcome. The purpose of bringing the case was to initiate a process that allows the Trump Campaign's claims to move through the trial court, appeals court, and on to the Supreme Court, which has the authority to overrule lower court...
  23. Reply to the article by George Soros Many believe that the prime minister of a country should not enter into an argument with George Soros. Their reasoning is that Soros is an economic criminal, because he made his money through speculation, ruining the lives of millions of people, and even blackmailing entire national economies. Just as governments must not negotiate with terrorists, they say, prime ministers must likewise not debate with economic criminals. Yet now I am compelled to do so, because in an article appearing on the Project Syndicate website on 18 November, the Hungarian-born speculator and billionaire George Soros issued open commands to the leaders of the European Union. In his article he instructs them to severely punish those Member States that do not want to become part of a unifying European empire under the banner of a global "open society". Throughout history, Europe's strength has always been derived from its nations. Although of different origins, European...
  24. 400% More Detroiters Missing Data on When they Requested their Absentee Ballots than Normal An anomaly in the election data could be an indication of massive absentee voter fraud in Detroit, and accounts for more votes than the difference between Trump and Biden in Michigan. The rate of missing data for when an absentee ballot was sent to a voter is four times greater in heavily Democrat Detroit/Wayne County than in the rest of the state. Of the 566,788 absentee ballots cast in Wayne County, the absentee data file provided by the Michigan Secretary of State indicates that 203,311 ballots show that no application for an absentee ballot was mailed or sent to that voter by their local clerk, which is a rate of roughly 36%. Of the remaining 2,719,718 absentee ballots outside of Wayne County (the statewide total minus the amount in Wayne County) there are 252,456 absentee ballots cast that show that no application for an absentee ballot was mailed or sent to that voter by their local...
  25. Four German holidaymakers who were illegally quarantined in Portugal after one was judged to be positive for Covid-19 have won their case, in a verdict that condemns the widely-used PCR test as being up to 97-percent unreliable. Earlier this month, Portuguese judges upheld a decision from a lower court that found the forced quarantine of four holidaymakers to be unlawful. The case centred on the reliability (or lack thereof) of Covid-19 PCR tests. The verdict, delivered on November 11, followed an appeal against a writ of habeas corpus filed by four Germans against the Azores Regional Health Authority. This body had been appealing a ruling from a lower court which had found in favour of the tourists, who claimed that they were illegally confined to a hotel without their consent. The tourists were ordered to stay in the hotel over the summer after one of them tested positive for coronavirus in a PCR test - the other three were labelled close contacts and therefore made to quarantine...
  26. A high-profile nuclear scientist was reportedly assassinated in Iran on Friday. According to reports, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh-Mahabadi, a professor of physics at the Imam Hussein University in Tehran, was killed in Damavand County. He was a senior scientist at the Iranian Ministry of Defence and Armed Forces Logistics, Iran Front Page reported. Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was widely seen as the father of Iran's nuclear bomb programme. No individual or organisation has yet claimed responsibility for the reported assassination. Social media users in Iran shared pictures and videos from the alleged scene of the assassination. They said an explosion and firing were reported in the area.
  27. Signs of the times — Large anti-lockdown protests are sweeping across Europe. Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the UK, Poland. The media are trying to put a lid on coverage of these momentous events. In Southern California, five sheriffs of populous counties (17 million people) are refusing to enforce Governor Newsom's new curfew order. A petition to recall the governor is gaining steam. In New York, members of the Chasidic sect held a wedding attended by several thousand people, sitting closely packed without masks. In a more intimate setting, up close and powerfully personal, gym members and owners in Buffalo, New York, shouted down cops and a public health officer, who had entered the gym because the gathering exceeded the prescribed limit. The gym personnel drove out the cops and followed them, to make sure they left the property. In Buffalo, protestors came to the house of Erie County Executive, Mark Poloncarz, to express their anger at new lockdown restrictions. The protest...
  28. With snow reported the day before, we woke at 430am and drove as far up the mountain as possible. The roads were too icy to continue driving so we began hiking 10 kilometers below the summit of Pico do Arieiro a couple of hours before sunrise. In a crazy snowstorm, with frozen fingers and toes we reached the summit to see lightning strike the tower! Can't believe it was snowing on Madeira!
  29. A few dozen swans were killed and several were injured in a hail and windstorm earlier this month. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources confirmed 36 swans died and eight were injured, with more still being called in from residents in Davis and Salt Lake counties. "Due to the nature of the blunt force injuries and other indicators, it is believed that the storm forced the birds down, resulting in high-speed impacts with the ground or other stationary objects," a statement by DWR read. Nearly two weeks ago, heavy winds and hailstorms hit the Wasatch Front on Friday night into Saturday morning, causing damages to property and wildlife.
  30. At least seven people died due to lightning strikes that hit several regions in Mozambique's central province Manica on Wednesday, the provincial governor announced on Thursday. Five of the seven deaths occurred in the district of Mossurize, south of the province and the rest in the district of Manica, said the Governor of the Manica province Francisca Tomas at the opening of a meeting with non-governmental organizations in the province. "In addition to the fatalities, bad weather, accompanied by rain and strong winds, destroyed several public and private infrastructures," said the governor, adding that a multisectoral team has been created to assess the level of destruction. "What we can say is that there are seven dead and destruction of infrastructure. It is preliminary information and gradually we will have to update it properly," she said. There are reports of the destruction of various infrastructures, interruption of access routes and fall of trees in the regions most...
  31. Australia has told 13 special forces soldiers they face dismissal in relation to a report on alleged unlawful killings in Afghanistan, the head of the country's army said on Friday. An independent report published last week in redacted form said there was evidence that 39 unarmed Afghan prisoners and civilians were killed by 19 Australian soldiers. None of the 19 soldiers were identified in the report, which was written by a state judge appointed by the inspector-general of defence. The 19 current and former soldiers have been referred for possible prosecution.
  32. Projected President-elect Joe Biden's top cabinet selections, deeply tied to the defence industry, will likely ensure US troops get stuck in more intractable military conflicts, analysts told Sputnik. On Tuesday, Biden announced his selection of Antony Blinken as secretary of state, Jake Sullivan as national security adviser, Avril Haines as director of national intelligence and Alejandro Mayorkas to lead the Department of Homeland Security. Biden's picks are all Obama-era officials with whom the former vice president has worked side by side and who supported the foreign policies of then-president Barack Obama and ex-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, including intervention in Libya, a controversial approach to militants in Syria, the drawn-out withdrawal from Iraq, and others.
  33. Brexiteer Arron Banks is celebrating a win against The Observer investigator Carole Cadwalladr, who reportedly admitted in court filings that her claims that money for the Leave campaign came from Russia lacked any evidence. Cadwalladr won the 2018 Orwell Prize for her reporting on the Cambridge Analytica scandal and big-data influence on the Brexit referendum. Her reports fit like a glove on the overarching narrative, which claims that unfavorable voting outcomes in the West are products of clandestine Russian psyops and cyber action. "Brexit and Trump were intimately entwined... Brexit was the petri dish for Trump," she said in a TED Talk last year. One particular person was featured heavily in her reporting. Arron Banks, a prominent donor of the Leave campaign, who was insinuated to be a go-between to pour Russian money into making Britain leave the EU. Banks saw some of the things Cadwalladr said as libelous and filed a lawsuit against her.
  34. Four teenage students have been charged in France over the killing of Samuel Paty, including three for allegedly pointing out the teacher to his murderer, a source said. Three other pupils were charged with complicity earlier this month over the beheading last month of Paty, who had shown his students cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad as part of a lesson on free speech. Three of the four students charged on Thursday were suspected of identifying Paty to his killer, 18-year-old Abdullakh Anzorov, who then tracked him down and beheaded him in a street near his school. The three, who are between 13 and 14 years old, are being charged with "complicity in a terrorist murder", the source said. The fourth is the daughter of Brahim Chnina, who launched a virulent online campaign against Paty denouncing the teacher's use of the cartoons published by the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. She has been charged with "slanderous denunciation" of Paty after relating her version of events in the...
  35. A South Korean court on Thursday sentenced the leader of an online sexual blackmail ring to 40 years in prison, the Yonhap news agency reported. Cho Ju-bin, 24, was found guilty of running an online network that blackmailed at least 74 women, including 16 teenagers, into what authorities called "virtual enslavement" by forcing them to send increasingly degrading and sometimes violent sexual imagery of themselves between May 2019 and February 2020. The Seoul Central District Court sentenced Cho for violating criminal and child protection laws by making and releasing pornography and running a criminal organisation, Yonhap said.
  36. People should not hug or kiss their grandparents at Christmas despite the loosening of coronavirus restrictions, one of the UK's top medical officers has warned. In the strongest Christmas covid warning yet, Professor Chris Whitty said: "Would I encourage someone to hug and kiss their elderly relatives? No I would not, if you want them to survive to be hugged again." He added: "Would I want someone to see their family? Of course, that's what Christmas is about, whether people celebrate Christmas as a festival themselves or from any other belief system. It is an opportunity for families. "But would I encourage someone to hug and kiss their elderly relatives? No, I would not." The warning came as the Prime Minister said further lockdowns in the new year might be necessary if people do not adhere to new tier system of lockdown rules unveiled for England on Thursday. Separate covid alert levels are in place already in Scotland.
  37. Three French police officers have been suspended after they were filmed beating and allegedly racially abusing a music producer in his Paris studio. An official inquiry has been opened - the third such investigation in a week - into the officers' behaviour. The latest incident comes after MPs in the French parliament voted to approve a new law increasing police powers. The victim, identified only by his first name, Michel, was returning to his music studio in Paris's 17th arrondissement last Saturday evening when police spotted he was not wearing a mask. Three officers, two in uniform and one in plain clothes, allegedly jumped from their car and pushed Michel through the front door of his property.
  38. A Central Intelligence Agency officer conducting counterterrorism operations in Somalia has reportedly been killed. The New York Times reported Thursday that the officer, whose identify remains classified, was a member of the CIA's paramilitary division and was a former member of Navy's SEAL Team 6. The officer was likely killed in either a counterinsurgency raid or a direct enemy attack, but the CIA has declined inquiries into the death. The Times claimed that the officer's death marks the 135th CIA casualty over the past 20 years.
  39. No, thanks was the response many residents gave to the government's plan for compulsory contact tracing through a QR code system in Mexico City. Privacy is a concern in Mexico as the government does not have a good track record of respecting citizens' rights and citizens weren't going to put up with any contact tracing. On November 13, the local government of Mexico City tweeted that contact tracing through a QR code system would be compulsory at public places such as restaurants. "All persons entering a closed space must scan a QR code with their mobile device," the graphic stated, atop a list of steps spelling out how the program will work.
  40. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials said a homeless man arrested in connection with a pair of fatal stabbings at a Northern California church is an illegal immigrant with an extensive criminal background. 32-year-old Fernando de Jesus Lopez-Garcia allegedly stabbed five people Sunday, including two who died, at the Grace Baptist Church in San Jose. Authorities said his criminal history includes convictions for battery of an officer, assault with a deadly weapon and vandalism. He was also previously deported three times, but protected by local sanctuary laws.
  41. Colorado's latest snow storm is wrapping up, leaving the Interstate 25 urban corridor with a winter wonderland, a mess on the roads and a new spot in the history books. Denver International Airport tallied 5 inches of snow. This is a record daily snowfall for Nov. 24, breaking the old record of 4 inches set in 1946. Even more notably, it was the first daily November snow record to fall in the city since 1994. Snow totals across the rest of the metro area generally range from 3 to 6 inches, with heavier amounts up to 10 inches in the western suburbs. This was a rare November snowstorm in the Denver area beyond the record-breaking amount. Another rarity lies within the heavy and wet nature of the snow.
  42. Comment: The following article was published in the Johns Hopkins University newsletter on November 22nd. It has since been taken down, so we're archiving it on Sott.net. This university has been 'Covid-19 central' for data collection and analysis for all countries globally from the get-go. After 10 months of global panic, its experts have confirmed that there is, in their own words, "no evidence that COVID-19 created any excess deaths" in 2020. In short, this has all been for nothing. According to new data, the U.S. currently ranks first in total COVID-19 cases, new cases per day and deaths. Genevieve Briand, assistant program director of the Applied Economics master's degree program at Hopkins, critically analyzed the effect of COVID-19 on U.S. deaths using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in her webinar titled "COVID-19 Deaths: A Look at U.S. Data." From mid-March to mid-September, U.S. total deaths have reached 1.7 million, of which 200,000, or 12%...
  43. If we keep treating the U.S. dollar like it is toilet paper, it is just a matter of time before our entire financial system goes down the tubes. At this moment, the dollar is still the primary reserve currency of the world, and the fact that we control it is an absolutely massive advantage for us. Because the rest of the globe uses dollars to trade with one another, that creates a tremendous amount of artificial demand for our currency, and it keeps the value of our currency elevated at a level that it much higher than it otherwise would be. But now that we are starting to act like the Weimar Republic in their heyday, it is only going to be a matter of time before everyone else on the planet starts abandoning the U.S. dollar in droves. We are literally killing our "golden goose", and most Americans do not even understand what is happening. The remarks that John Williams made about hyperinflation during a recent interview with Greg Hunter have created quite an uproar, but the truth...
  44. Politicians whom the gods wish to destroy, they first make ridiculous. On Tuesday evening, as the deaths attributed to COVID-19 reached 50,000, Emmanuel Macron, president of the Republic, again commandeered French television channels to announce his latest strategy to end the national lockdown. He claimed to be making himself perfectly clear as his timetable for ending lockdown was conditioned by the subjunctive. The big give was that from Saturday, we are to be allowed to spend three hours daily outside, and to venture 20km, or 12.5 miles, (no more) from our front doors. (This will be a relief to a friend in the Dordogne who was 'verbalisé' by the flics last week when she was discovered 1.2km (three-quarters of a mile) from her house, 200 meters (an eighth of a mile) more than permitted.) From December 15, cinemas, theaters and discotheques may open, and the lockdown will officially end, although with a sting. There will be a national curfew from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. The nightclubs...
  45. Pullman, Washington — The ancient inhabitants of the American Southwest used around 11,500 feathers to make a turkey feather blanket, according to a new paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. The people who made such blankets were ancestors of present-day Pueblo Indians such as the Hopi, Zuni and Rio Grande Pueblos. A team led by Washington State University archaeologists analyzed an approximately 800-year-old, 99 x 108 cm (about 39 x 42.5 inches) turkey feather blanket from southeastern Utah to get a better idea of how it was made. Their work revealed thousands of downy body feathers were wrapped around 180 meters (nearly 200 yards) of yucca fiber cord to make the blanket, which is currently on display at the Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum in Blanding, Utah. The researchers also counted body feathers from the pelts of wild turkeys purchased from ethically and legally compliant dealers in Idaho to get an estimate of how many turkeys would have been needed to...
  46. In a freshly-published book, Maria Butina has documented her time inside the American prison system, where she spent more than a year after being dubbed a foreign agent acting on behalf of Moscow's 'influence campaign.' The book '#Prison diary' is based on the journal Butina kept chronicling her experiences behind bars, including the time she spent in solitary confinement. The young gun rights activist from Siberia was in the US on a student visa when she was arrested in July 2018. It was the height of the Russiagate scandal surrounding allegations that Moscow actively meddled in American affairs to get Donald Trump elected president. Butina attended National Rifle Association events and met with several Republican politicians and conservative activists. The FBI said it was all part of a larger campaign by Moscow to infiltrate American political circles.
  47. NY Times journalist-turned-Covid-19 skeptic Alex Berenson briefly had his latest anti-lockdown book pulled from Amazon along with its electronic version. By the time it returned, it was a top-10 bestseller on Apple Books. First the paperback and then the electronic edition of 'Unreported Truths about Covid-19 and Lockdowns - Part 3: Masks' were removed from Amazon on Tuesday, Berenson revealed in a series of tweets that same day. The book attempts to debunk the hypothesis, favored by most governments but apparently lacking convincing scientific proof, that wearing even non-medical masks stops the spread of Covid-19.
  48. Shocking footage has emerged showing California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers forcibly removing families who were occupying vacant state-owned homes in LA. Crowds of activists showed up to defend the families on Thanksgiving eve. The videos, reportedly captured Wednesday night in the El Sereno area, make for intense viewing; law enforcement agents are seen dragging people out of the homes, dressed in riot gear, armed with military-style guns and even using battering rams on doors. "Be human again," one protester calls to the officers, adding that they are acting like "domestic terrorists." In one particularly disturbing video, a female who appears to be a teenager is carried out of a home by officers as activists scream at officers.
  49. Convicted fraudster Bill Browder, now a prominent anti-Russia agitator in the West, is accusing British bank NatWest of closing his account due to a dastardly "black PR" campaign waged against him by malign actors in Moscow. Browder's allegation, reiterated unquestioningly by The Guardian, has emerged via a report issued by opaquely-funded neoconservative think tank the Henry Jackson Society (HJS). The wealthy financier made a fortune in Russia, initially during the wild 1990s. However, like many foreigners and, indeed, locals operating in the country at the time, he found conditions tougher when regulation and oversight was tightened-up in the 2000s. He was found guilty of evading around $40 million in taxes, and accused of siphoning off money to offshore accounts. In 2005, he was banned from Russia, just a year after he had written supportively about Vladimir Putin's government in The Moscow Times. After this reversal in fortunes, he quickly turned against the Kremlin and...
  50. Late night host Stephen Colbert was beaming with joy during his new interview with Barack Obama, telling him he has to "get used to looking at a president again," and the lovey-dovey exchange is making social media cringe. "I just want to take a moment to drink you in for just a moment, because I'm having to get used to looking at a president again," Colbert told Obama on Tuesday night during 'The Late Show' after some light banter back and forth between the two. "I got to warm up for Joe Biden," Colbert continued while his guest laughed. "I don't want to pull anything when I see him take the oath of office. You got to ease me into this a little bit." "Physically painful to watch," Washington Examiner reporter Jerry Dunleavey tweeted in reaction to the widely shared clip. "Isn't this more or less what Toobin got in trouble for?" reporter Becket Adams added, sarcastically referring to former New Yorker writer Jeffrey Toobin, who was let go after reportedly exposing himself during a...