Signs Of The Times RSS

Signs of the Times: The World for People who Think. Featuring independent, unbiased, alternative news and commentary on world events.
Signs of the Times
  1. Christchurch mosque killer Brenton Tarrant has launched a high court appeal to have his designation as a terrorist revoked. The Australian white supremacist wants the court to review decisions made by the NZ Department of Corrections about his prison conditions, and his designation as a "terrorist entity" under the country's Terrorism Suppression Act. The judicial review will be heard at the High Court in Auckland on Thursday. He will be representing himself.
  2. Capitol Police officers were instructed by leaders not to use their most aggressive tactics when responding to the mob of pro-Trump rioters who stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, according to a new report from the agency's internal watchdog. In the report, titled "Review of the Events Surrounding the Jan. 6, 2021, Takeover of the U.S. Capitol," which was obtained by The New York Times, Capitol Police Inspector General Michael Bolton found that three days before the mob attack, officials were warned in an intelligence assessment of the potential for violence on Jan. 6 in which "Congress itself is the target." "Stop the Steal's propensity to attract white supremacists, militia members, and others who actively promote violence may lead to a significantly dangerous situation for law enforcement and the general public alike," the assessment added, Bolton noted in his report.
  3. Hundreds of corporations including Google and Amazon signed on to a statement, released Wednesday, expressing opposition to "any discriminatory legislation" that would make it harder to vote. The statement was organized by Kenneth Chenault, a former chief executive of American Express, and Kenneth Frazier, the chief executive of Merck. Other companies backing the statement include Black Rock, Netflix, General Motors, and Starbucks.
  4. ABC announced a set of 'inclusion standards' last year following death of George Floyd One of Disney's top bosses has spoken candidly about pilots the company passed on due to a lack of diversity in their scripts. "I will tell you for the first time we received some incredibly well-written scripts that did not satisfy our standards in terms of inclusion, and we passed on them," Dana Walden, Walt Disney Television's Chairman of Entertainment, said during a panel discussion last week, according to The Hollywood Reporter. As an example, Walden cited a script that told the story of a White family and whose diversity of characters would have likely come from neighbors.
  5. A Boston hospital says it will offer "preferential care based on race" and "race-explicit interventions" in an attempt to engage in an "antiracist agenda for medicine" based on critical race theory. A Boston Review article titled "An Antiracist Agenda for Medicine" lays out a plan from Brigham and Women's Hospital that implements a "reparations framework" for distributing medical resources in order to "comprehensively confront structural racism."
  6. California public schools are embarking on a new experiment: education as social justice. Earlier this year, the state Department of Education approved an ethnic studies model curriculum, and individual school districts have begun to implement programs that advocate "decolonizing" the United States and "liberating" students from capitalism, patriarchy, and settler colonialism. This will likely come as a surprise to most California residents, who may be familiar with the movement's euphemisms — "ethnic studies," "educational equity," "culturally responsive teaching" — but do not understand the philosophical and political premises of these programs. As the state and many school districts begin to implement the state ethnic studies curriculum, however, details are emerging. I have obtained documents from one such program, the Santa Clara County Office of Education's Ethnic Studies Initiative, that paint a disturbing picture of the ethnic studies curriculum and the activists leading...
  7. Two out of every three Portuguese families are struggling to make ends meet. This is one of the conclusions of a new study by consumer watchdog DECO in a week when data from the Institute of Employment and Vocational Training shows unemployment throughout the country has leapt nearly 37% (the percentage is far worse in the Algarve: 74%). Stresses DECO, "more than half Portuguese families lost income in 2020". The pandemic has served to "highlight the inequalities that already existed", says the organisation which listened to almost 4,700 households before publishing its findings. Comment: No, the government lockdown exacerbated inequalities to the point of poverty and hunger for much of the population. The report's bottom line is that 63% of families are in financial difficulties (6% describe their situations as "critical"); only 31% say they are financially 'comfortable'; 27% say they have lost a quarter or more of their income, while one in four households say income has fallen,...
  8. By continuing to push for lockdowns to 'protect hospitals', authorities worldwide are denying millions of cancer sufferers and other seriously ill people essential treatment. This will lead to many unnecessary deaths. It is shocking that in 2021, surgeries for cancer and other critical ailments are being delayed. But thanks to the hysteria over overcrowded ICUs, staggering numbers of patients are being denied life-saving treatments for up to one year. UK media recently reported a drop of around 350,000 urgent cancer referrals between March last year and January this year, compared to the same period in the previous 12 months. A researcher described the situation as a "ticking time bomb." There has also been a decrease in surgeries and chemotherapy and radiology treatments, "with 44,000 fewer patients diagnosed with cancer starting treatment." This problem is not unique to Britain. Canadian provinces face similarly unacceptable numbers of delayed surgeries and treatments. As of...
  9. Miranda Wayland said TV bosses must ensure characters have an environment and culture around them that is 'absolutely reflective' of their background. The creative diversity chief of the BBC has suggested the TV series Luther "doesn't feel authentic" because the lead character has few black friends and does not eat Caribbean food. Idris Elba, 48, stars as haunted rogue detective DCI John Luther in the critically acclaimed police drama, which has run for five series since 2010 on BBC One.
  10. Americans said in a recent poll by YouGov that Washington, D.C., is the worst place in America. The poll paired two states in head-to-head matches and states were then ranked on their "win percentage." The poll included all 50 states plus D.C. D.C. came in last place, only winning 35 percent of its match-ups. Surveyors said that D.C. lagging at the bottom could be due to the political nature of the city or the fact it is not a state.
  11. Conservative journalist Jason Whitlock was suspended by Twitter after he criticized Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors for her $1.4 million home purchase in "1.4 percent" black Topanga Canyon in Southern California. But Whitlock insisted Monday he has no intention of bowing to the social media giant in order to get his account unblocked: "I'm not running to go post Twitter bail when I did nothing wrong." Khan-Cullors was sharply criticized last week over numerous reports that she had purchased the pricey home — particularly given her self-described Marxist ideology. What's more, reports noted that Khan-Cullors had purchased three other homes since 2016 for a grand total of $3.2 million in real estate.
  12. Joel Greenberg, a former Florida tax collector indicted in the Justice Department's investigation into possible sex crimes that also includes Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.), is reportedly cooperating with federal authorities. Greenberg has told investigators that he and Gaetz had encounters with multiple women who were given monetary payments or gifts in exchange for sex, according to two people familiar with the matter who spoke to The New York Times. The sources told the Times that Greenberg has already met with investigators several times, ultimately deciding to cooperate after he was made aware of the overwhelming amount of evidence against him.
  13. The British spy agency GCHQ is so aggressive, extreme and unconstrained by law or ethics that the NSA — not exactly world renowned for its restraint — often farms out spying activities too scandalous or illegal for the NSA to their eager British counterparts. There is, as the Snowden reporting demonstrated, virtually nothing too deceitful or invasive for the GCHQ. They spy on entire populations, deliberately disseminate fake news, exploit psychological research to control behavior and manipulate public perception, and destroy the reputations, including through the use of sex traps, of anyone deemed adversarial to the British government. But they want you to know that they absolutely adore gay people. In fact, they love the cause of LGBT equality so very much that, beginning on May 17, 2015 — International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia — they started draping their creepy, UFO-style headquarters in the colors of the rainbow flag. The prior year, in 2014, they had...
  14. A small space rock about the size of a car or truck made a slightly intrusive but not very intimidating flyby on Monday. Asteroid 2021 GW4 came within 12,324 miles (19,833 kilometers) of the surface of Earth at its closest point of approach Monday morning Pacific time, according to Harvard astronomer Jonathan McDowell. That puts the asteroid well inside the ring where many large artificial satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 22,236 miles (35,786 kilometers). "Fortunately space is still rather empty at these altitudes," McDowell wrote on Twitter. He estimated that the nearest functioning satellite to the asteroid's path was a military GPS satellite about 1,243 miles (2,000 kilometers) away. NASA estimates the asteroid's diameter at between 11 and 25 feet (3.5 and 7.7 meters). That's small enough that the entire thing would likely burn up if it collided with our atmosphere.
  15. I posted Episode 398 of The Corbett Report podcast, "Science Says," around 10 PM Japanese Standard Time on Friday, April 9th, 2021, and then went to bed. Sometime shortly after midnight, the main Corbett Report channel was removed from YouTube. And, just like that, 14 years of work — some 1700+ videos, 569,000+ subscribers and 90 million+ video views — was erased from the digital ether. . . . Well, the GooTube portion of that digital ether, anyway. Given that I've been promoting YouTube alternatives since at least 2009, and given that I have made video after video after video after video after video warning my audience that I would be banned from GooTube, and given that I even delivered a presentation last year noting that The Library of Alexandria is on Fire, it's safe to say that this news did not catch me off guard. Learning about the banning after waking up on Saturday morning, my only thought was, "Well, that took longer than I expected." Indeed, it was not surprising in any...
  16. Mauna Loa, the world's largest active volcano, covering half of the Big Island of Hawaii, was ratted by 34 small earthquakes on Sunday. Though only registering small magnitudes, scientists have warned citizens that the mounting seismic activity could signal that an eruption may be possible in the near future. There have been 155 earthquakes greater than 1.5 on the Richter scale in the past seven days, and 740 in the past month, including a 4.3 on 3 April. Sunday's largest tremor was a 3.2 magnitude quake that struck Pahala, south of the summit of Mauna Loa at 8.08pm local time. A 3.0 tremor also struck in the afternoon. In March, the US Geological Survey said that as the volcano continues to awaken from its slumber, it would be a good time for people to revisit their personal emergency plans in the event of an eruption.
  17. Scientists at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute in Sydney have discovered a critical new gene that it is hoped could help human hearts repair damaged heart muscle after a heart attack. Researchers have identified a genetic switch in zebrafish that turns on cells allowing them to divide and multiply after a heart attack, resulting in the complete regeneration and healing of damaged heart muscle in these fish. It's already known that zebrafish can heal their own hearts, but how they performed this incredible feat remained unknown, until now. In research recently published in the prestigious journal, Science, the team at the Institute drilled down into a critical gene known as Klf1 that previously had only been identified in red blood cells. For the first time they discovered it plays a vital role in healing damaged hearts. Dr. Kazu Kikuchi, who led this world first research, said he was astonished by the findings. "Our research has identified a secret switch that allows...
  18. A new investigation of stone tools buried in graves provides evidence supporting the existence of a division of different types of labor between people of male and female biological sex at the start of the Neolithic. Alba Masclans of Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on April 14, 2021. Previous research has suggested that a sexual division of labor existed in Europe during the transition to the Neolithic period, when farming practices spread across the continent. However, many questions remain as to how different tasks became culturally associated with women, men, and perhaps other genders at this time. Comment: Notably the article only speculates on 'other genders', because, as the skeletons will likely attest, there are only 2: Sex differences in immune responses to viral infection
  19. Around 400 protestors reportedly gathered outside GraceLife Church in Alberta, Canada on Sunday after it was closed last week for violating local COVID-19 health orders. Alberta Health Services (AHS) said it "physically closed" the building and will be preventing access to it until GraceLife "can demonstrate the ability to comply with Alberta's Chief Medical Officer of Health's restrictions." Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officers barred congregants' access to the church Sunday.
  20. Bernard Madoff, the one-time Wall Street titan who orchestrated one of the largest frauds in history, has died in prison aged 82. Madoff, known as Bernie, was a former chairman of the Nasdaq stock exchange, and was regarded for years as an investment sage. But unbeknown to his thousands of victims, he was running a Ponzi scheme that wiped out at least $17.5bn in savings. Imposing a 150-year sentence in 2009, judge Denny Chin called Madoff's crimes "extraordinarily evil". His criminal behavior devastated the lives of his victims, leading to suicides, bankruptcies and home losses.
  21. By making accusations of vote fraud he was not able to prove, both before and after the election, Donald Trump made it easy for his critics to dismiss as dishonest any and all concerns about election integrity. Typical was a New York Times "fact check" from late September denouncing as "false" GOP claims that expanding access to absentee ballots and voting by mail facilitated election fraud. Linda Qiu wrote: "There have been numerous independent studies and government reviews finding voter fraud extremely rare in all forms, that includes 'absentee ballots' and 'vote-by-mail ballots' between which there is 'no meaningful difference. Not only are both 'secure forms of voting, they are considered the 'gold standard of election security.'" To pass a law limiting the use of absentee ballots, as Georgia recently did, is no longer to choose a side in a legitimate debate over how to balance ballot integrity and ease of voting. Instead, to express concern about the risk of election fraud is...
  22. Relations between Washington and Moscow might have hit historic lows in recent weeks, but President Joe Biden's intelligence chief has now announced that Russia is more interested in working with America than directly against it. In an unclassified report released on Tuesday by Avril Haines, the US director of national intelligence, officials were optimistic about their Russian counterparts' intentions to strengthen bilateral ties. "We expect Moscow to seek opportunities for pragmatic cooperation with Washington," the analysis stated. However, it added that the Kremlin would insist on forming any partnerships "on its own terms." Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, has previously claimed the US is eager to deal with the country "from a position of power," and that Moscow would refuse to engage on such a basis. At the same time, Washington's intelligence community said that "we assess that Russia does not want a direct conflict with US forces," but warned its...
  23. Israel's Mossad has long operated in nearby Iraq, including in a 1966 operation to steal a Soviet-built MiG-21 fighter jet for the United States and a plot in the 1970s to assassinate Iraqi nationalist leader Saddam Hussein with a bomb hidden inside a book. According to unconfirmed reports, a safe house used by the Mossad, Israel's spy agency, has been attacked in northern Iraq. "'Unknown resistance forces' target Mossad safe house in Northern Iraq," Sabereen News Telegram reported Wednesday morning, adding that several "Israeli spies were killed" and promising to soon share photos of the operation. The report did not say the city where the safe house was located, and only identified its source as an announcement from "a security source." According to Iran Press News Agency, Sabereen is an outlet connected to Harakat Hezbollah al-Nujaba (Movement of the Party of God's Nobles), a Shiite militia in Iraq. Iran's PressTV noted that no other news sources in northern Iraq have reported...
  24. Serious question: Who died and made these woke corporations ruler of all, the veritable masters of the universe? Who made them the arbiters of right and wrong? Since when do they get to decide what is an acceptable form of free speech or what election laws should or should not get passed in this country? If you're not half asleep, perhaps you've noticed this dynamic: we are rapidly shifting into a government of, by and for the corporations, with our Constitution being secondary to the corporations' arbitrary, woke one. Corporations, many of which no longer consider themselves American companies but more global ones, composed of "citizens of the world," have decided to enforce their view of the world onto almost every subject. They don't consider the damage their decision-making does to Main Street, only how much they can line their own pockets — even if they have to use foreign slave labor to do it. Now they arrogantly lecture us as though they were paragons of moral uprightness....
  25. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is seeking to end his running feud with President Trump, which escalated this weekend when the former president insulted him as a "dumb son of a bitch" and a "stone-cold loser" for not backing his false claims about the election. Trump's comments were especially stinging as they were widely publicized and came one day after Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.), the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), gave Trump a "Champion of Freedom Award" at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort. Trump lashed out at McConnell the following Saturday evening at a Republican donor event, where he blamed him for Republicans losing the White House. "If that were Schumer instead of this dumb son of a bitch Mitch McConnell they would never allow it to happen. They would have fought it," Trump said, referring to newly minted Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and the election results. McConnell on Tuesday wanted no part in the food fight...
  26. For decades, a Palestinian village on the southern tip of Jerusalem has lived on and cultivated the land. But a series of recent efforts by Israel is not only threatening their way of life but potentially displacing them from their homes. On January 25, the Jerusalem District Planning Committee rejected the residents of Palestinian village al-Walaja's plan to legalize their homes and further develop the community. Instead, the committee declared their land an ancient agricultural area in need of environmental conservation that should be transformed into a national park. The notion of environmental integrity struck Amy Cohen, director of international relations and advocacy at Israeli non-profit Ir Amim, as contradictory. "The planning committee and the [Israel] Civil Administration within the West Bank [have] been promoting and advancing plans within the same area for Jewish settlers. It shows massive discrimination in how [Israel] treats Palestinian areas in order to suppress the...
  27. British actor John Cleese has been both cheered and chastised for ridiculing voice actor Hank Azaria over his apology to "every single Indian person" for his portrayal of Simpsons character Apu. Azaria drew a mixed response this week when he said sorry for his portrayal of the long-running cartoon's Indian shopkeeper Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, whose stereotypical identity, the actor said, had helped maintain "structural racism." Cleese issued his own humorous take on the political correctness row after many Simpsons fans said Azaria's comedy did not require him to apologize and accused the actor of trying to be "woke."
  28. Researchers are fairly certain that we gained our favorite satellite, the Moon, after a planet, Theia, collided with the proto-Earth 4.5 billion years ago. What's not certain are the details surrounding Theia's fate. Was it a hit-and-run, or did the mantles of the two planets merge? Qian Yuan, Earth scientist at Arizona State University, and his colleagues recently suggested a new line of evidence to support the latter hypothesis, suggesting that Theia not only merged with Earth, but we might know right where the remnants of its mantle reside in Earth. Giant impact hypothesis "Compared to the Moon, there is much less [known] about Theia," says Yuan. "The Moon is there. You have samples. People have been there... few people care too much about the impactor." A lot of the work around the giant impact hypothesis involves comparing isotopes found on the Moon with those found on Earth. Their similarities in composition suggest that the Moon is made of a hunk of ancient Earth, meaning...
  29. The big news of the day is that Biden decided to call Putin. Here is how the Russians reported this: At the initiative of the American side, a telephone conversation took place between President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin and President of the United States of America Joseph Biden. The current state of Russian-American relations and some relevant aspects of the international agenda were discussed in detail. Joseph Biden confirmed his earlier invitation to the Russian President to take part in the Climate Summit, which will be held via videoconference on April 22-23. Both sides expressed their readiness to continue the dialogue on the most important areas of ensuring global security, which would meet the interests of not only Russia and the United States, but also the entire world community. Moreover, Joseph Biden expressed interest in normalizing the state of affairs on the bilateral track and establishing stable and predictable cooperation on such pressing issues as...
  30. Project Veritas founder James O'Keefe has announced that he intends to take CNN to court for making false statements about his conservative media organization. He says more sensational revelations about the network are to come. O'Keefe made the provocative statements while speaking to Fox News' Sean Hannity on Tuesday, following Veritas' release of an undercover video showing CNN technical director Charlie Chester explaining how the broadcaster allegedly used "propaganda" to help oust Donald Trump from the White House. "CNN considers themselves the most trusted name in news, but here they are admitting that they are trying to help certain political candidates and they're trying to hide that," he told the Fox host.
  31. Kieran Bhattacharya is a student at the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine. On October 25, 2018, he attended a panel discussion on the subject of microaggressions. Dissatisfied with the definition of a microaggression offered by the presenter — Beverly Cowell Adams, an assistant dean — Bhattacharya raised his hand. Within a few weeks, as a result of the fallout from Bhattacharya's question about microagressions, the administration had branded him a threat to the university and banned him from campus. He is now suing UVA for violating his First Amendment rights, and a judge recently ruled that his suit should proceed.
  32. President Joe Biden plans to withdraw the remaining 2,500 U.S. troops from Afghanistan by Sept. 11, 2021, 20 years to the day after the al Qaeda attacks that triggered America's longest war, U.S. officials said on Tuesday. Comment: By choosing this date the Biden administration appears to be more concerned with arousing highly charged emotions in Americans rather than leaving Afghanistan as soon as possible. However, what with the US' subsequent war on Iraq, Libya, Syria, and its assistance to the Saudi's with their war on Yemen, it is blatantly clear by now that 9/11 merely served as the pretext for America's war on, and occupation of, the Middle East. The disclosure of the plan came on the same day that the U.S. intelligence community released a gloomy outlook for Afghanistan, forecasting "low" chances of a peace deal this year and warning that its government would struggle to hold the Taliban insurgency at bay if the U.S.-led coalition withdraws support.
  33. Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation co-founder and executive director Patrisse Cullors, a self-identified "trained Marxist," raked in upwards of $20,000 a month serving as the chairwoman of a Los Angeles jail reform group in 2019, according to campaign finance records reviewed by the Daily Caller News Foundation. Reform LA Jails disbursed a total of $191,000 to Cullors in 2019 through her consulting firm, Janaya and Patrisse Consulting, according to financial records submitted to the California Fair Political Practices Commission. The description for each of the seven reported payments to the Cullors' firm that year read: "P. Cullors, Principal Officer, Business Owner." It's unclear when exactly Reform LA Jails began paying Cullors through her firm, which is named after the BLM co-founder and her spouse, Janaya Khan. The first payment of $51,000 occurred between January 2019 and the end of June 2019, according to an FPPC report covering that timeframe. The exact date of...
  34. Almost a quarter of registered Covid deaths were not caused by the virus, new official figures reveal. Data from the Office for National Statistics shows 23 per cent of coronavirus fatalities are now people who have died "with" the virus rather than from an infection. This means the disease was not the primary cause of death recorded on death certificates, despite the person who died testing positive for Covid. Other data also shows an increasingly positive picture of the state of the pandemic in Britain.
  35. A technical director for CNN made the grave error of sitting down with a (probably hot) undercover female journalist from Project Veritas, to whom he admitted that the network "got Trump out" with their coverage, and that he "100% believe(s) that if it wasn't for CNN, I don't know that Trump would have got voted out." "I came to CNN because I wanted to be part of that," added the director, Charlie Chester. Hethen explained how the network engaged in propaganda to 'create a story' about Trump vs. Biden.
  36. I am a teacher at Grace Church High School in Manhattan. Ten years ago, I changed careers when I discovered how rewarding it is to help young people explore the truth and beauty of mathematics. I love my work. As a teacher, my first obligation is to my students. But right now, my school is asking me to embrace "antiracism" training and pedagogy that I believe is deeply harmful to them and to any person who seeks to nurture the virtues of curiosity, empathy and understanding. "Antiracist" training sounds righteous, but it is the opposite of truth in advertising. It requires teachers like myself to treat students differently on the basis of race. Furthermore, in order to maintain a united front for our students, teachers at Grace are directed to confine our doubts about this pedagogical framework to conversations with an in-house "Office of Community Engagement" for whom every significant objection leads to a foregone conclusion. Any doubting students are likewise "challenged" to...
  37. A Toronto family is speaking out about what they call the "utter uselessness" of Canada's hotel quarantine program where their 74-year-old father believes he contracted a coronavirus variant of concern and then spread it to the rest of the family. On March 2, Syed Shah landed at Pearson International Airport on a flight from Pakistan, where he had been staying to sort out a tenant issue with a property the North York family owns. He was swabbed for a PCR test at the terminal while his son, Syed Haider, booked his father a stay at the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Centre on Dixon Road.
  38. A New Jersey man is in the hospital with COVID-19 — just five weeks after being vaccinated. Francisco Cosme, 52, was ecstatic when he booked an appointment for the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine at the Javits Center on March 6. After Cosme was vaccinated, he continued to wear a mask and follow social distancing guidelines but he became "very confused and began doing things that were not normal," his daughter, Michelle Torres, told The Post. "April 1 was the very first day he started to have symptoms," Torres said. "He had a cough, fever, chills, everything." The 31-year-old drove her father to a clinic where he tested positive for COVID-19 and he was instructed to quarantine for 10 days.
  39. Several cars fell into a sinkhole after a hot water pipe broke in the parking lot of a shopping centre in St. Petersburg on Monday. Footage filmed by eyewitnesses shows the cars slowly falling into the hole. According to the press office of the Fuel and Energy Complex, the reason behind the accident was a technological malfunction that caused a burst of the main pipeline. The press service also added that reconstruction of the road is currently undergoing.
  40. A report published last year by the WEF-Carnegie Cyber Policy Initiative calls for the merging of Wall Street banks, their regulators and intelligence agencies as necessary to confront an allegedly imminent cyber attack that will collapse the existing financial system. In November 2020, the World Economic Forum (WEF) and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace co-produced a report that warned that the global financial system was increasingly vulnerable to cyber attacks. Advisors to the group that produced the report included representatives from the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, the International Monetary Fund, Wall Street giants likes JP Morgan Chase and Silicon Valley behemoths like Amazon. The ominous report was published just months after the World Economic Forum had conducted a simulation of that very event - a cyber attack that brings the global financial system to its knees - in partnership with Russia's largest bank, which is due to jumpstart that country's...
  41. For more than a decade Bill Gates has funneled millions of dollars into a scientifically mad scheme allegedly to study the possibility of "manmade global cooling." The project, led by a Harvard physicist, proposes to send satellites into the atmosphere in order to drop tons of chemicals in an attempt to block the sun. Now a strong resistance within Sweden has forced Gates & co. to abandon the planned Swedish satellite launch. This latest adventure in geoengineering by Gates shows what an unscientific enterprise the global warming charade is. As Gates no doubt well knows, in fact the Earth has slowly been cooling as we enter what some astrophysicists estimate could be several decades of global cooling caused by a Grand Solar Minimum cycle we entered in 2020. On April 2 the Swedish Space Agency, announced that the program, the Stratospheric Controlled Perturbation Experiment (SCoPEx), funded by Bill Gates, has "divided the scientific community" and will therefore not be carried...
  42. In an effort to boost ratings, CNN has announced a series of special broadcasts revisiting some of the most riveting and sensational moments of the Trump Russia collusion investigation. "Our loyal fans have been asking for this," said CNN President Jeff Zucker. "We hear over and over again how exciting and compelling our dramatic coverage of the Russia investigation was. This year, we will be showing special reruns of the best moments from our courageous journalism covering the evil dealings of Trump with the nefarious evil powers of Russia!"
  43. There have been 60 shootings on expressways in Mayor Lori Lightfoot's (D) Chicago so far this year. Fox News notes this puts the city on pace to top the 128 shootings witnessed in all of 2020, and it already surpasses the 52 such shootings which took place in 2019. Illinois State Police are responding to the gun violence surge by spending $12.5 million on cameras with which to monitor the expressways.
  44. Demonstrations erupted in a Minneapolis suburb on Sunday night after a police officer fatally shot a man during a traffic stop. Crowds of mourners gathered at the site of the shooting, and relatives identified the victim as Daunte Wright, an African American resident of the Minneapolis suburb of Brooklyn Center. Police did not identify the driver and said the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office will release the name once the family was notified. Chief Tim Gannon of the Brooklyn Center Police Department said officers pulled the man over for a traffic violation and attempted to detain him when they learned of a warrant out for the man's arrest. However, the man reentered his car, at which point an officer shot him.
  45. Cloth face masks during exercise limit performance and physical capacity, study finds Heart rate peaks lower and oxygen intake drops, according to sports science research Cloth face coverings limit performance and physical capacity during exercise, a new study has found. Masked joggers said they felt claustrophobic during higher-intensity exercise and their oxygen intake was reduced, according to research. Heart rate was found to have a lower peak while exercising with a mask and participants could not keep up a jog for as long as when unmasked.
  46. The mystic Santa Maria del Oro lagoon has turned brownish-red overnight, surprising locals and residents of Nayarit, Mexico. The Santa Maria del Oro Laguna, nearly 2.25km long and 1.2km wide, is located inside a crater, formed by a meteorite fall thousands of years ago. Lagoon in Mexico changes color overnight
  47. Even as vaccination drives are in full swing, the possibility of another wave of the deadly coronavirus is not far away in the US Midwest. The rate of hospitalisations is alarmingly increasing in Michigan, and the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are running out of space for coronavirus patients. As per Johns Hopkins University data, nearly 7,226 cases have been reported on a daily basis in the past week.
  48. An eighteen seater Hummer bus loaded with passengers was swept inside a culvert at Lagos park axis of Enugu-Onitsha express road following Sunday night downpour, killing seventeen out of eighteen passengers on board, IgbereTV reports. Eighteen people were in the bus and only two people were found while they are trying to break the culvert filled with debris to pull out others trapped. One survivor (a woman) was rushed to Toronto hospital, Upper Iweka while rescue operation continued. Speaking on the incident, the Medical Director of Toronto Hospital, Onitsha, Dr. Emeka Eze, advised drivers to be perceptive to the nature of roads and routes noting that some portions of the road are bad and the environmental condition not conducive during rainy season.
  49. Hank Azaria is doing the work. In an interview with Dax Shepard on his podcast "Armchair Expert," the 56-year-old actor revealed that he's on a major guilt trip over his longtime role as Kwik-E-Mart shopkeeper Apu Nahasapeemapetilon on "The Simpsons." Azaria, who no longer voices the controversial character, says he's taking some unconventional steps to find out why his portrayal was offensive toward the Indian community.
  50. Heavy rain caused flash floods in the city of Villavicencio in Meta Department of Colombia. Heavy rain fell from 11 April, triggering severe floods across Villavicencio. Local government said 200 families were affected. Emergency teams were attending incidents at 31 points of the city. Local media said at least 50 people were evacuated. Colombia's Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology and Environmental Studies (IDEAM) reported that the Guayuriba River at Villavicencio reached 6.2 metres on 12 April, above the danger mark of 6 metres. Civil Defence in Colombia reported floods in other areas of Meta during the same period, with homes damaged in Guamal and Granada. Earlier this month Civil Defence reported floods in El Dorado municipality, 06 to 07 April. Around 100 homes were damaged and 400 people affected.